Wallets My Bitcoin

Bitfi Crypto Wallet Promoted By John McAfee Removes Unhackable Claim After Being Hacked Multiple Times /r/Bitcoin

Bitfi Crypto Wallet Promoted By John McAfee Removes Unhackable Claim After Being Hacked Multiple Times /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Multiple Reddit accounts & wallets hacked posting on malicious crypto currency themed website /r/Bitcoin

Multiple Reddit accounts & wallets hacked posting on malicious crypto currency themed website /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: TIL the Large Bitcoin Collider has successfully cracked private keys for multiple bitcoin wallets, despite quantum computing still being decades away. /r/hacking

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: TIL the Large Bitcoin Collider has successfully cracked private keys for multiple bitcoin wallets, despite quantum computing still being decades away. /hacking submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Ultimate glossary of crypto currency terms, acronyms and abbreviations

I thought it would be really cool to have an ultimate guide for those new to crypto currencies and the terms used. I made this mostly for beginner’s and veterans alike. I’m not sure how much use you will get out of this. Stuff gets lost on Reddit quite easily so I hope this finds its way to you. Included in this list, I have included most of the terms used in crypto-communities. I have compiled this list from a multitude of sources. The list is in alphabetical order and may include some words/terms not exclusive to the crypto world but may be helpful regardless.
2FA
Two factor authentication. I highly advise that you use it.
51% Attack:
A situation where a single malicious individual or group gains control of more than half of a cryptocurrency network’s computing power. Theoretically, it could allow perpetrators to manipulate the system and spend the same coin multiple times, stop other users from completing blocks and make conflicting transactions to a chain that could harm the network.
Address (or Addy):
A unique string of numbers and letters (both upper and lower case) used to send, receive or store cryptocurrency on the network. It is also the public key in a pair of keys needed to sign a digital transaction. Addresses can be shared publicly as a text or in the form of a scannable QR code. They differ between cryptocurrencies. You can’t send Bitcoin to an Ethereum address, for example.
Altcoin (alternative coin): Any digital currency other than Bitcoin. These other currencies are alternatives to Bitcoin regarding features and functionalities (e.g. faster confirmation time, lower price, improved mining algorithm, higher total coin supply). There are hundreds of altcoins, including Ether, Ripple, Litecoin and many many others.
AIRDROP:
An event where the investors/participants are able to receive free tokens or coins into their digital wallet.
AML: Defines Anti-Money Laundering laws**.**
ARBITRAGE:
Getting risk-free profits by trading (simultaneous buying and selling of the cryptocurrency) on two different exchanges which have different prices for the same asset.
Ashdraked:
Being Ashdraked is essentially a more detailed version of being Zhoutonged. It is when you lose all of your invested capital, but you do so specifically by shorting Bitcoin. The expression “Ashdraked” comes from a story of a Romanian cryptocurrency investor who insisted upon shorting BTC, as he had done so successfully in the past. When the price of BTC rose from USD 300 to USD 500, the Romanian investor lost all of his money.
ATH (All Time High):
The highest price ever achieved by a cryptocurrency in its entire history. Alternatively, ATL is all time low
Bearish:
A tendency of prices to fall; a pessimistic expectation that the value of a coin is going to drop.
Bear trap:
A manipulation of a stock or commodity by investors.
Bitcoin:
The very first, and the highest ever valued, mass-market open source and decentralized cryptocurrency and digital payment system that runs on a worldwide peer to peer network. It operates independently of any centralized authorities
Bitconnect:
One of the biggest scams in the crypto world. it was made popular in the meme world by screaming idiot Carlos Matos, who infamously proclaimed," hey hey heeeey” and “what's a what's a what's up wasssssssssuuuuuuuuuuuuup, BitConneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeect!”. He is now in the mentally ill meme hall of fame.
Block:
A package of permanently recorded data about transactions occurring every time period (typically about 10 minutes) on the blockchain network. Once a record has been completed and verified, it goes into a blockchain and gives way to the next block. Each block also contains a complex mathematical puzzle with a unique answer, without which new blocks can’t be added to the chain.
Blockchain:
An unchangeable digital record of all transactions ever made in a particular cryptocurrency and shared across thousands of computers worldwide. It has no central authority governing it. Records, or blocks, are chained to each other using a cryptographic signature. They are stored publicly and chronologically, from the genesis block to the latest block, hence the term blockchain. Anyone can have access to the database and yet it remains incredibly difficult to hack.
Bullish:
A tendency of prices to rise; an optimistic expectation that a specific cryptocurrency will do well and its value is going to increase.
BTFD:
Buy the fucking dip. This advise was bestowed upon us by the gods themselves. It is the iron code to crypto enthusiasts.
Bull market:
A market that Cryptos are going up.
Consensus:
An agreement among blockchain participants on the validity of data. Consensus is reached when the majority of nodes on the network verify that the transaction is 100% valid.
Crypto bubble:
The instability of cryptocurrencies in terms of price value
Cryptocurrency:
A type of digital currency, secured by strong computer code (cryptography), that operates independently of any middlemen or central authoritie
Cryptography:
The art of converting sensitive data into a format unreadable for unauthorized users, which when decoded would result in a meaningful statement.
Cryptojacking:
The use of someone else’s device and profiting from its computational power to mine cryptocurrency without their knowledge and consent.
Crypto-Valhalla:
When HODLers(holders) eventually cash out they go to a place called crypto-Valhalla. The strong will be separated from the weak and the strong will then be given lambos.
DAO:
Decentralized Autonomous Organizations. It defines A blockchain technology inspired organization or corporation that exists and operates without human intervention.
Dapp (decentralized application):
An open-source application that runs and stores its data on a blockchain network (instead of a central server) to prevent a single failure point. This software is not controlled by the single body – information comes from people providing other people with data or computing power.
Decentralized:
A system with no fundamental control authority that governs the network. Instead, it is jointly managed by all users to the system.
Desktop wallet:
A wallet that stores the private keys on your computer, which allow the spending and management of your bitcoins.
DILDO:
Long red or green candles. This is a crypto signal that tells you that it is not favorable to trade at the moment. Found on candlestick charts.
Digital Signature:
An encrypted digital code attached to an electronic document to prove that the sender is who they say they are and confirm that a transaction is valid and should be accepted by the network.
Double Spending:
An attack on the blockchain where a malicious user manipulates the network by sending digital money to two different recipients at exactly the same time.
DYOR:
Means do your own research.
Encryption:
Converting data into code to protect it from unauthorized access, so that only the intended recipient(s) can decode it.
Eskrow:
the practice of having a third party act as an intermediary in a transaction. This third party holds the funds on and sends them off when the transaction is completed.
Ethereum:
Ethereum is an open source, public, blockchain-based platform that runs smart contracts and allows you to build dapps on it. Ethereum is fueled by the cryptocurrency Ether.
Exchange:
A platform (centralized or decentralized) for exchanging (trading) different forms of cryptocurrencies. These exchanges allow you to exchange cryptos for local currency. Some popular exchanges are Coinbase, Bittrex, Kraken and more.
Faucet:
A website which gives away free cryptocurrencies.
Fiat money:
Fiat currency is legal tender whose value is backed by the government that issued it, such as the US dollar or UK pound.
Fork:
A split in the blockchain, resulting in two separate branches, an original and a new alternate version of the cryptocurrency. As a single blockchain forks into two, they will both run simultaneously on different parts of the network. For example, Bitcoin Cash is a Bitcoin fork.
FOMO:
Fear of missing out.
Frictionless:
A system is frictionless when there are zero transaction costs or trading retraints.
FUD:
Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt regarding the crypto market.
Gas:
A fee paid to run transactions, dapps and smart contracts on Ethereum.
Halving:
A 50% decrease in block reward after the mining of a pre-specified number of blocks. Every 4 years, the “reward” for successfully mining a block of bitcoin is reduced by half. This is referred to as “Halving”.
Hardware wallet:
Physical wallet devices that can securely store cryptocurrency maximally. Some examples are Ledger Nano S**,** Digital Bitbox and more**.**
Hash:
The process that takes input data of varying sizes, performs an operation on it and converts it into a fixed size output. It cannot be reversed.
Hashing:
The process by which you mine bitcoin or similar cryptocurrency, by trying to solve the mathematical problem within it, using cryptographic hash functions.
HODL:
A Bitcoin enthusiast once accidentally misspelled the word HOLD and it is now part of the bitcoin legend. It can also mean hold on for dear life.
ICO (Initial Coin Offering):
A blockchain-based fundraising mechanism, or a public crowd sale of a new digital coin, used to raise capital from supporters for an early stage crypto venture. Beware of these as there have been quite a few scams in the past.
John mcAfee:
A man who will one day eat his balls on live television for falsely predicting bitcoin going to 100k. He has also become a small meme within the crypto community for his outlandish claims.
JOMO:
Joy of missing out. For those who are so depressed about missing out their sadness becomes joy.
KYC:
Know your customer(alternatively consumer).
Lambo:
This stands for Lamborghini. A small meme within the investing community where the moment someone gets rich they spend their earnings on a lambo. One day we will all have lambos in crypto-valhalla.
Ledger:
Away from Blockchain, it is a book of financial transactions and balances. In the world of crypto, the blockchain functions as a ledger. A digital currency’s ledger records all transactions which took place on a certain block chain network.
Leverage:
Trading with borrowed capital (margin) in order to increase the potential return of an investment.
Liquidity:
The availability of an asset to be bought and sold easily, without affecting its market price.
of the coins.
Margin trading:
The trading of assets or securities bought with borrowed money.
Market cap/MCAP:
A short-term for Market Capitalization. Market Capitalization refers to the market value of a particular cryptocurrency. It is computed by multiplying the Price of an individual unit of coins by the total circulating supply.
Miner:
A computer participating in any cryptocurrency network performing proof of work. This is usually done to receive block rewards.
Mining:
The act of solving a complex math equation to validate a blockchain transaction using computer processing power and specialized hardware.
Mining contract:
A method of investing in bitcoin mining hardware, allowing anyone to rent out a pre-specified amount of hashing power, for an agreed amount of time. The mining service takes care of hardware maintenance, hosting and electricity costs, making it simpler for investors.
Mining rig:
A computer specially designed for mining cryptocurrencies.
Mooning:
A situation the price of a coin rapidly increases in value. Can also be used as: “I hope bitcoin goes to the moon”
Node:
Any computing device that connects to the blockchain network.
Open source:
The practice of sharing the source code for a piece of computer software, allowing it to be distributed and altered by anyone.
OTC:
Over the counter. Trading is done directly between parties.
P2P (Peer to Peer):
A type of network connection where participants interact directly with each other rather than through a centralized third party. The system allows the exchange of resources from A to B, without having to go through a separate server.
Paper wallet:
A form of “cold storage” where the private keys are printed onto a piece of paper and stored offline. Considered as one of the safest crypto wallets, the truth is that it majors in sweeping coins from your wallets.
Pre mining:
The mining of a cryptocurrency by its developers before it is released to the public.
Proof of stake (POS):
A consensus distribution algorithm which essentially rewards you based upon the amount of the coin that you own. In other words, more investment in the coin will leads to more gain when you mine with this protocol In Proof of Stake, the resource held by the “miner” is their stake in the currency.
PROOF OF WORK (POW) :
The competition of computers competing to solve a tough crypto math problem. The first computer that does this is allowed to create new blocks and record information.” The miner is then usually rewarded via transaction fees.
Protocol:
A standardized set of rules for formatting and processing data.
Public key / private key:
A cryptographic code that allows a user to receive cryptocurrencies into an account. The public key is made available to everyone via a publicly accessible directory, and the private key remains confidential to its respective owner. Because the key pair is mathematically related, whatever is encrypted with a public key may only be decrypted by its corresponding private key.
Pump and dump:
Massive buying and selling activity of cryptocurrencies (sometimes organized and to one’s benefit) which essentially result in a phenomenon where the significant surge in the value of coin followed by a huge crash take place in a short time frame.
Recovery phrase:
A set of phrases you are given whereby you can regain or access your wallet should you lose the private key to your wallets — paper, mobile, desktop, and hardware wallet. These phrases are some random 12–24 words. A recovery Phrase can also be called as Recovery seed, Seed Key, Recovery Key, or Seed Phrase.
REKT:
Referring to the word “wrecked”. It defines a situation whereby an investor or trader who has been ruined utterly following the massive losses suffered in crypto industry.
Ripple:
An alternative payment network to Bitcoin based on similar cryptography. The ripple network uses XRP as currency and is capable of sending any asset type.
ROI:
Return on investment.
Safu:
A crypto term for safe popularized by the Bizonnaci YouTube channel after the CEO of Binance tweeted
“Funds are safe."
“the exchage I use got hacked!”“Oh no, are your funds safu?”
“My coins better be safu!”


Sats/Satoshi:
The smallest fraction of a bitcoin is called a “satoshi” or “sat”. It represents one hundred-millionth of a bitcoin and is named after Satoshi Nakamoto.
Satoshi Nakamoto:
This was the pseudonym for the mysterious creator of Bitcoin.
Scalability:
The ability of a cryptocurrency to contain the massive use of its Blockchain.
Sharding:
A scaling solution for the Blockchain. It is generally a method that allows nodes to have partial copies of the complete blockchain in order to increase overall network performance and consensus speeds.
Shitcoin:
Coin with little potential or future prospects.
Shill:
Spreading buzz by heavily promoting a particular coin in the community to create awareness.
Short position:
Selling of a specific cryptocurrency with an expectation that it will drop in value.
Silk road:
The online marketplace where drugs and other illicit items were traded for Bitcoin. This marketplace is using accessed through “TOR”, and VPNs. In October 2013, a Silk Road was shut down in by the FBI.
Smart Contract:
Certain computational benchmarks or barriers that have to be met in turn for money or data to be deposited or even be used to verify things such as land rights.
Software Wallet:
A crypto wallet that exists purely as software files on a computer. Usually, software wallets can be generated for free from a variety of sources.
Solidity:
A contract-oriented coding language for implementing smart contracts on Ethereum. Its syntax is similar to that of JavaScript.
Stable coin:
A cryptocoin with an extremely low volatility that can be used to trade against the overall market.
Staking:
Staking is the process of actively participating in transaction validation (similar to mining) on a proof-of-stake (PoS) blockchain. On these blockchains, anyone with a minimum-required balance of a specific cryptocurrency can validate transactions and earn Staking rewards.
Surge:
When a crypto currency appreciates or goes up in price.
Tank:
The opposite of mooning. When a coin tanks it can also be described as crashing.
Tendies
For traders , the chief prize is “tendies” (chicken tenders, the treat an overgrown man-child receives for being a “Good Boy”) .
Token:
A unit of value that represents a digital asset built on a blockchain system. A token is usually considered as a “coin” of a cryptocurrency, but it really has a wider functionality.
TOR: “The Onion Router” is a free web browser designed to protect users’ anonymity and resist censorship. Tor is usually used surfing the web anonymously and access sites on the “Darkweb”.
Transaction fee:
An amount of money users are charged from their transaction when sending cryptocurrencies.
Volatility:
A measure of fluctuations in the price of a financial instrument over time. High volatility in bitcoin is seen as risky since its shifting value discourages people from spending or accepting it.
Wallet:
A file that stores all your private keys and communicates with the blockchain to perform transactions. It allows you to send and receive bitcoins securely as well as view your balance and transaction history.
Whale:
An investor that holds a tremendous amount of cryptocurrency. Their extraordinary large holdings allow them to control prices and manipulate the market.
Whitepaper:

A comprehensive report or guide made to understand an issue or help decision making. It is also seen as a technical write up that most cryptocurrencies provide to take a deep look into the structure and plan of the cryptocurrency/Blockchain project. Satoshi Nakamoto was the first to release a whitepaper on Bitcoin, titled “Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System” in late 2008.
And with that I finally complete my odyssey. I sincerely hope that this helped you and if you are new, I welcome you to crypto. If you read all of that I hope it increased, you in knowledge.
my final definition:
Crypto-Family:
A collection of all the HODLers and crypto fanatics. A place where all people alike unite over a love for crypto.
We are all in this together as we pioneer the new world that is crypto currency. I wish you a great day and Happy HODLing.
-u/flacciduck
feel free to comment words or terms that you feel should be included or about any errors I made.
Edit1:some fixes were made and added words.
submitted by flacciduck to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Hacks & basic ways to protect your Crypto

Interest in Bitcoin is increasing globally. More and more people are willing to participate in Bitcoin trading and mining. However, Bitcoin history shows that it is not always as safe as we would like it to be. Let’s take a look at some major Bitcoin hacks.

Allinvain

Allinvain is a nickname of a user on BitcoinTalk forums. Basically, he was the first one to experience a major Bitcoin loss. He lost 25,000 bitcoins, all together it was worth around $500,000. The user believed that someone hacked into his computer to steal BTC.

Mt Gox

Shortly after Allinvain’s case, the next hack attempt happened. Mt Gox was one of the biggest exchanges that provided a trade between Bitcoin and fiat money. Hackers compromised its website and started to sell Bitcoins. Their actions made the price go down dramatically. However, attackers did not pay attention to the $1000 limit Mt Gox had. Nonetheless, that hack attack had an important influence on BTC.

Other exchanges

Exchanges are being attacked by hackers quite often.
In 2012 Bitfloor suffered a terrible attack and lost 24,000 BTC (around $250,000). Unfortunately, this exchange was not able to survive the attack and was closed in 2013.
In 2015 Bitstamp exchange was hacked. It lost approximately 19,000 BTC (around $5 million).
In 2016 Bitfinex also lost 120,000 BTC (around $77 million) to hackers.

Twitter hack

The last attack happened in one of the biggest social nets. Twitter became a part of the latest attackers’ actions. The most significant and world-famous accounts promoted Bitcoin scam for several hours.

Anti-hack protection

The most important question is how to protect your Bitcoin savings from upcoming attacks. Here are some basic things that may help you to be safe:
Even though there is no way to be a hundred percent safe, there are a lot of steps we can take to avoid unfortunate losses. Cryptocurrency services are improving their protection systems all the time, and we all should do what we can to make this network more secure.
submitted by SimpleSwapExchange to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Monero Community Workgroup is preparing for the large growth ahead

Diego (u/rehrar), Doug (u/needmoney90), and Justin (u/SamsungGalaxayPlayer) would like to share some exciting news regarding the Monero Community Workgroup (MCW). The Monero community is growing, and so is our support and group of volunteers. The TL;DR is that you can expect some cool things as we grow.

Some MCW History

The MCW initially began as the Monero Marketing Workgroup in March 2017. Diego was interested in helping grow the Monero community, so he contacted Justin and set up the MoneroMarketing subreddit. At the time, the idea of a Monero marketing initiative shocked many in the community, who greatly appreciated Monero's general distance from the marketing efforts by many ICOs and scams around that time.
The Monero Marketing Workgroup focused mostly on preparing educational materials and getting people involved to work on Monero-related initiatives. Shortly after the workgroup began, it transitioned into an area that needed more love: community organization and communication.
Up until this point, the Monero community was focused around the developer meetings and the Monero subreddit. While these are still highly relevant in the Monero ecosystem (for good reason), there wasn't a great way for people to stay updated with the latest news and to discuss non-development items. The Monero Community Crowdfunding System (at the time Forum Funding System) submissions weren't discussed in the same way that they are today, and there was no central Community Workgroup to help bring initiatives together. It was obvious that with a larger, more diverse Monero community, a dedicated set of resources would be necessary to connect all these projects together.
The Monero Marketing Workgroup became the Monero Community Workgroup during the first Community Workgroup meeting on 18 June 2017. These meetings have largely occurred every other Saturday ever since and serve as an essential community service to discuss CCS proposals, hear workgroup updates and news, and discuss new ideas. The Community Workgroup channel (#monero-community) is used for many other purposes, including other scheduled meetings on deemed-necessary items of interest and regular feedback, questions, and chat.
On 7 October 2017, the workgroup hosted its first Coffee Chat, a casual conversation covering the month's recent news and most important discussion topics. These Coffee Chats help humanize the Monero community, who until this point typically were only known by their pseudonyms. The MCW played a part in the Monero Konferenco, Critical Decentralization Cluster at the Chaos Communication Congress, and Monero Village at Defcon livestreams and derived content. It also hosts Breaking Monero, a series that features members from the Monero Research Lab who discuss Monero's limitations.
A year after the MCW became its new name, the newly-founded Monero Outreach Workgroup took over many of its initial ambitions in June 2018. Other related workgroups like Monero Ecosystem have their own communities and functions.

The Community Keeps Growing

The Monero communities are significantly larger than they were back in early-2017, and they keep on growing. In early-2017, there were no mobile wallets, the GUI was only 3 months old, there were far fewer exchanges, etc. Today, Monero has one of the largest, most respected, and most passionate communities. We have the third largest number of developers of any cryptocurrency project, we are the only project with our own DEF CON village, and we are one of the few names that everybody knows. Awesome work to everyone around, truly.
With larger communities comes more work. The community deserves reliable, appropriate resources to sustain this growth. In a decentralized community, this is difficult. Monero Core provides some essential services such as the CCS, getmonero.org, Mattermost, and GitLab. However, they have been unable to meet the growing needs of the community alone. Thus, the MCW has been happy to support other needs to the extent possible: we discuss CCS proposals during our meetings, host several servers, organize Coffee Chats and conference talks, and more, along with efforts of other workgroups. These have become such a significant undertaking, and that's a good thing. As Monero continues to set the gold standard for cryptocurrencies the expectations keep growing. It's awesome to be a part of something where so many people care.

Our Future

The MCW has grown too much for the three of us to organize all the resources we need, let alone the needs of everyone in the Monero communities and workgroups. Thus, we are furthering our commitment and offering substantially more services in the coming months. To get there, we need your support to fill volunteer leadership and support positions.
Expect the following dedicated services from us:
  1. Jitsi server with higher framerate and resolutions than Jitsi Meet, so that our Coffee Chats, conferences, and other events are better quality than before.
  2. NextCloud to safely and securely collaborate on blog posts, share files, and more.
  3. Sandstorm and Wekan kanban board (open source Trello copy) to keep track of, propose, and assign tasks and projects.
  4. Chatwoot to provide tailored support for Monero users with a volunteer support community (also a good learning exercise).
  5. Mastodon to communicate about Monero and other news, so we aren't dependent on Twitter's policies and security.
  6. Flarum forum for Monero news and discussions, so we aren't dependent on Reddit.
We need your help to make this happen! We will form "task forces" to focus on certain areas like marketing, system administration, meetings, moderation, and finance. If you have any of these skills, please join #monero-community and say hi, or shoot us an email ([email protected])!
Doug, Diego, and Justin feel that these changes will allow the Monero community to grow in new ways and continue collaborating. The community consists of many workgroups that focus on projects that they are interested in, and we want to support the efforts of these communities.
To allow these changes, Justin will form an LLC, with him and Doug being officially on the board, and Diego taking an advisory role.
Creating a legal entity serves two distinct purposes. First, it allows us to aggregate payments from many people into a single entity to pay the costs for hosting various community servers/services. This greatly reduces our own workload and out of pocket payment. Secondly, it allows us to aggregate multiple social media handles that are currently controlled by individuals under a single entity, to reduce the "Bus Factor."
Of course, the MCW will remain very much grounded in the ideals that made that made it great in the first place. And the entity will always support the Monero communities, never claim to fully represent everyone involved in Monero. It can only ever represent the efforts of those involved.
Current and future goals of the MCW include:
  1. Provide resources as necessary and reasonable, such as communication platforms
  2. Organize discussions to promote communication, such as Community Meetings and Coffee Chats
  3. Promote positive culture through events, such as with Coffee Chats, the Monero Konferenco, the Moneoversary, and the Monero DEF CON Village
  4. Support other Monero workgroups and Monero ecosystem projects
  5. Provide mechanisms to collect feedback on community, developer, and research proposals
  6. Discuss the Monero CCS ideas and otherwise support the Monero CCS
  7. Promote Monero and privacy education and marketing
  8. Serve as an available community mediatoarbitrator where reasonable
  9. Communicate the broad interests of the Monero community and provide a voice where and how appropriate
  10. Collaborate with other projects, companies, governments, and communities

Monero Community Support LLC

Q: Why does the MCW think that an LLC is needed?
A: For two primary reasons. First, payments. As mentioned, there is existing digital infrastructure, currently paid out of pocket by MCW leaders. Even if a CCS proposal was to be explored, it would make personal accounting and tax reporting very difficult as assets would technically be mixed with personal assets, throwing off capital gains calculations. Up until now this has been a sacrifice of time that we were content to make, but as we continue to ramp up our goals it is becoming increasingly cumbersome, and alternative methods are needed. An LLC would be able to hold these monetary assets as its own entity, and all funds could be kept separate from personal funds, leading to much easier accounting all around.
Secondly, an LLC would allow for digital infrastructure to come under the legal purview of several people, reducing the possibility for any particular person going rogue and decimating what has been built. There may be concern about bringing resources under a corporation, and that this is not in the spirit of Monero, but one thing to note is that all assets and services (noted above) are FOSS/CC. Meaning if at any time a community doesn't care for what the MCW accomplishes under this LLC, they can simply start their own infrastructure with low switching costs. Once again: EVERYTHING IS FOSS/CC.
Q: Why not a nonprofit, cooperative, or other type of organization?
A: While not out of the question, these take additional effort. We hope to grow into these organization types with the help of others. However certain registrations take a lot of time and effort, plus has quite significant restrictions on activities. The LLC will allow us the flexibility and convenience we need now, especially when we currently have no income anyway.

Looking Ahead

The MCW has a mountain range of opportunities ahead of it, as do all Monero communities and workgroups. We hope that our efforts are of use to you and others, and we hope that you join us in making something great :)
Justin, Diego, and Doug
submitted by SamsungGalaxyPlayer to Monero [link] [comments]

Bob The Magic Custodian



Summary: Everyone knows that when you give your assets to someone else, they always keep them safe. If this is true for individuals, it is certainly true for businesses.
Custodians always tell the truth and manage funds properly. They won't have any interest in taking the assets as an exchange operator would. Auditors tell the truth and can't be misled. That's because organizations that are regulated are incapable of lying and don't make mistakes.

First, some background. Here is a summary of how custodians make us more secure:

Previously, we might give Alice our crypto assets to hold. There were risks:

But "no worries", Alice has a custodian named Bob. Bob is dressed in a nice suit. He knows some politicians. And he drives a Porsche. "So you have nothing to worry about!". And look at all the benefits we get:
See - all problems are solved! All we have to worry about now is:
It's pretty simple. Before we had to trust Alice. Now we only have to trust Alice, Bob, and all the ways in which they communicate. Just think of how much more secure we are!

"On top of that", Bob assures us, "we're using a special wallet structure". Bob shows Alice a diagram. "We've broken the balance up and store it in lots of smaller wallets. That way", he assures her, "a thief can't take it all at once". And he points to a historic case where a large sum was taken "because it was stored in a single wallet... how stupid".
"Very early on, we used to have all the crypto in one wallet", he said, "and then one Christmas a hacker came and took it all. We call him the Grinch. Now we individually wrap each crypto and stick it under a binary search tree. The Grinch has never been back since."

"As well", Bob continues, "even if someone were to get in, we've got insurance. It covers all thefts and even coercion, collusion, and misplaced keys - only subject to the policy terms and conditions." And with that, he pulls out a phone-book sized contract and slams it on the desk with a thud. "Yep", he continues, "we're paying top dollar for one of the best policies in the country!"
"Can I read it?' Alice asks. "Sure," Bob says, "just as soon as our legal team is done with it. They're almost through the first chapter." He pauses, then continues. "And can you believe that sales guy Mike? He has the same year Porsche as me. I mean, what are the odds?"

"Do you use multi-sig?", Alice asks. "Absolutely!" Bob replies. "All our engineers are fully trained in multi-sig. Whenever we want to set up a new wallet, we generate 2 separate keys in an air-gapped process and store them in this proprietary system here. Look, it even requires the biometric signature from one of our team members to initiate any withdrawal." He demonstrates by pressing his thumb into the display. "We use a third-party cloud validation API to match the thumbprint and authorize each withdrawal. The keys are also backed up daily to an off-site third-party."
"Wow that's really impressive," Alice says, "but what if we need access for a withdrawal outside of office hours?" "Well that's no issue", Bob says, "just send us an email, call, or text message and we always have someone on staff to help out. Just another part of our strong commitment to all our customers!"

"What about Proof of Reserve?", Alice asks. "Of course", Bob replies, "though rather than publish any blockchain addresses or signed transaction, for privacy we just do a SHA256 refactoring of the inverse hash modulus for each UTXO nonce and combine the smart contract coefficient consensus in our hyperledger lightning node. But it's really simple to use." He pushes a button and a large green checkmark appears on a screen. "See - the algorithm ran through and reserves are proven."
"Wow", Alice says, "you really know your stuff! And that is easy to use! What about fiat balances?" "Yeah, we have an auditor too", Bob replies, "Been using him for a long time so we have quite a strong relationship going! We have special books we give him every year and he's very efficient! Checks the fiat, crypto, and everything all at once!"

"We used to have a nice offline multi-sig setup we've been using without issue for the past 5 years, but I think we'll move all our funds over to your facility," Alice says. "Awesome", Bob replies, "Thanks so much! This is perfect timing too - my Porsche got a dent on it this morning. We have the paperwork right over here." "Great!", Alice replies.
And with that, Alice gets out her pen and Bob gets the contract. "Don't worry", he says, "you can take your crypto-assets back anytime you like - just subject to our cancellation policy. Our annual management fees are also super low and we don't adjust them often".

How many holes have to exist for your funds to get stolen?
Just one.

Why are we taking a powerful offline multi-sig setup, widely used globally in hundreds of different/lacking regulatory environments with 0 breaches to date, and circumventing it by a demonstrably weak third party layer? And paying a great expense to do so?
If you go through the list of breaches in the past 2 years to highly credible organizations, you go through the list of major corporate frauds (only the ones we know about), you go through the list of all the times platforms have lost funds, you go through the list of times and ways that people have lost their crypto from identity theft, hot wallet exploits, extortion, etc... and then you go through this custodian with a fine-tooth comb and truly believe they have value to add far beyond what you could, sticking your funds in a wallet (or set of wallets) they control exclusively is the absolute worst possible way to take advantage of that security.

The best way to add security for crypto-assets is to make a stronger multi-sig. With one custodian, what you are doing is giving them your cryptocurrency and hoping they're honest, competent, and flawlessly secure. It's no different than storing it on a really secure exchange. Maybe the insurance will cover you. Didn't work for Bitpay in 2015. Didn't work for Yapizon in 2017. Insurance has never paid a claim in the entire history of cryptocurrency. But maybe you'll get lucky. Maybe your exact scenario will buck the trend and be what they're willing to cover. After the large deductible and hopefully without a long and expensive court battle.

And you want to advertise this increase in risk, the lapse of judgement, an accident waiting to happen, as though it's some kind of benefit to customers ("Free institutional-grade storage for your digital assets.")? And then some people are writing to the OSC that custodians should be mandatory for all funds on every exchange platform? That this somehow will make Canadians as a whole more secure or better protected compared with standard air-gapped multi-sig? On what planet?

Most of the problems in Canada stemmed from one thing - a lack of transparency. If Canadians had known what a joke Quadriga was - it wouldn't have grown to lose $400m from hard-working Canadians from coast to coast to coast. And Gerald Cotten would be in jail, not wherever he is now (at best, rotting peacefully). EZ-BTC and mister Dave Smilie would have been a tiny little scam to his friends, not a multi-million dollar fraud. Einstein would have got their act together or been shut down BEFORE losing millions and millions more in people's funds generously donated to criminals. MapleChange wouldn't have even been a thing. And maybe we'd know a little more about CoinTradeNewNote - like how much was lost in there. Almost all of the major losses with cryptocurrency exchanges involve deception with unbacked funds.
So it's great to see transparency reports from BitBuy and ShakePay where someone independently verified the backing. The only thing we don't have is:
It's not complicated to validate cryptocurrency assets. They need to exist, they need to be spendable, and they need to cover the total balances. There are plenty of credible people and firms across the country that have the capacity to reasonably perform this validation. Having more frequent checks by different, independent, parties who publish transparent reports is far more valuable than an annual check by a single "more credible/official" party who does the exact same basic checks and may or may not publish anything. Here's an example set of requirements that could be mandated:
There are ways to structure audits such that neither crypto assets nor customer information are ever put at risk, and both can still be properly validated and publicly verifiable. There are also ways to structure audits such that they are completely reasonable for small platforms and don't inhibit innovation in any way. By making the process as reasonable as possible, we can completely eliminate any reason/excuse that an honest platform would have for not being audited. That is arguable far more important than any incremental improvement we might get from mandating "the best of the best" accountants. Right now we have nothing mandated and tons of Canadians using offshore exchanges with no oversight whatsoever.

Transparency does not prove crypto assets are safe. CoinTradeNewNote, Flexcoin ($600k), and Canadian Bitcoins ($100k) are examples where crypto-assets were breached from platforms in Canada. All of them were online wallets and used no multi-sig as far as any records show. This is consistent with what we see globally - air-gapped multi-sig wallets have an impeccable record, while other schemes tend to suffer breach after breach. We don't actually know how much CoinTrader lost because there was no visibility. Rather than publishing details of what happened, the co-founder of CoinTrader silently moved on to found another platform - the "most trusted way to buy and sell crypto" - a site that has no information whatsoever (that I could find) on the storage practices and a FAQ advising that “[t]rading cryptocurrency is completely safe” and that having your own wallet is “entirely up to you! You can certainly keep cryptocurrency, or fiat, or both, on the app.” Doesn't sound like much was learned here, which is really sad to see.
It's not that complicated or unreasonable to set up a proper hardware wallet. Multi-sig can be learned in a single course. Something the equivalent complexity of a driver's license test could prevent all the cold storage exploits we've seen to date - even globally. Platform operators have a key advantage in detecting and preventing fraud - they know their customers far better than any custodian ever would. The best job that custodians can do is to find high integrity individuals and train them to form even better wallet signatories. Rather than mandating that all platforms expose themselves to arbitrary third party risks, regulations should center around ensuring that all signatories are background-checked, properly trained, and using proper procedures. We also need to make sure that signatories are empowered with rights and responsibilities to reject and report fraud. They need to know that they can safely challenge and delay a transaction - even if it turns out they made a mistake. We need to have an environment where mistakes are brought to the surface and dealt with. Not one where firms and people feel the need to hide what happened. In addition to a knowledge-based test, an auditor can privately interview each signatory to make sure they're not in coercive situations, and we should make sure they can freely and anonymously report any issues without threat of retaliation.
A proper multi-sig has each signature held by a separate person and is governed by policies and mutual decisions instead of a hierarchy. It includes at least one redundant signature. For best results, 3of4, 3of5, 3of6, 4of5, 4of6, 4of7, 5of6, or 5of7.

History has demonstrated over and over again the risk of hot wallets even to highly credible organizations. Nonetheless, many platforms have hot wallets for convenience. While such losses are generally compensated by platforms without issue (for example Poloniex, Bitstamp, Bitfinex, Gatecoin, Coincheck, Bithumb, Zaif, CoinBene, Binance, Bitrue, Bitpoint, Upbit, VinDAX, and now KuCoin), the public tends to focus more on cases that didn't end well. Regardless of what systems are employed, there is always some level of risk. For that reason, most members of the public would prefer to see third party insurance.
Rather than trying to convince third party profit-seekers to provide comprehensive insurance and then relying on an expensive and slow legal system to enforce against whatever legal loopholes they manage to find each and every time something goes wrong, insurance could be run through multiple exchange operators and regulators, with the shared interest of having a reputable industry, keeping costs down, and taking care of Canadians. For example, a 4 of 7 multi-sig insurance fund held between 5 independent exchange operators and 2 regulatory bodies. All Canadian exchanges could pay premiums at a set rate based on their needed coverage, with a higher price paid for hot wallet coverage (anything not an air-gapped multi-sig cold wallet). Such a model would be much cheaper to manage, offer better coverage, and be much more reliable to payout when needed. The kind of coverage you could have under this model is unheard of. You could even create something like the CDIC to protect Canadians who get their trading accounts hacked if they can sufficiently prove the loss is legitimate. In cases of fraud, gross negligence, or insolvency, the fund can be used to pay affected users directly (utilizing the last transparent balance report in the worst case), something which private insurance would never touch. While it's recommended to have official policies for coverage, a model where members vote would fully cover edge cases. (Could be similar to the Supreme Court where justices vote based on case law.)
Such a model could fully protect all Canadians across all platforms. You can have a fiat coverage governed by legal agreements, and crypto-asset coverage governed by both multi-sig and legal agreements. It could be practical, affordable, and inclusive.

Now, we are at a crossroads. We can happily give up our freedom, our innovation, and our money. We can pay hefty expenses to auditors, lawyers, and regulators year after year (and make no mistake - this cost will grow to many millions or even billions as the industry grows - and it will be borne by all Canadians on every platform because platforms are not going to eat up these costs at a loss). We can make it nearly impossible for any new platform to enter the marketplace, forcing Canadians to use the same stagnant platforms year after year. We can centralize and consolidate the entire industry into 2 or 3 big players and have everyone else fail (possibly to heavy losses of users of those platforms). And when a flawed security model doesn't work and gets breached, we can make it even more complicated with even more people in suits making big money doing the job that blockchain was supposed to do in the first place. We can build a system which is so intertwined and dependent on big government, traditional finance, and central bankers that it's future depends entirely on that of the fiat system, of fractional banking, and of government bail-outs. If we choose this path, as history has shown us over and over again, we can not go back, save for revolution. Our children and grandchildren will still be paying the consequences of what we decided today.
Or, we can find solutions that work. We can maintain an open and innovative environment while making the adjustments we need to make to fully protect Canadian investors and cryptocurrency users, giving easy and affordable access to cryptocurrency for all Canadians on the platform of their choice, and creating an environment in which entrepreneurs and problem solvers can bring those solutions forward easily. None of the above precludes innovation in any way, or adds any unreasonable cost - and these three policies would demonstrably eliminate or resolve all 109 historic cases as studied here - that's every single case researched so far going back to 2011. It includes every loss that was studied so far not just in Canada but globally as well.
Unfortunately, finding answers is the least challenging part. Far more challenging is to get platform operators and regulators to agree on anything. My last post got no response whatsoever, and while the OSC has told me they're happy for industry feedback, I believe my opinion alone is fairly meaningless. This takes the whole community working together to solve. So please let me know your thoughts. Please take the time to upvote and share this with people. Please - let's get this solved and not leave it up to other people to do.

Facts/background/sources (skip if you like):



Thoughts?
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

Best Cryptocurrency Multi-Exchange Trading and Portfolio Management Platforms Ranking 2020

Best Cryptocurrency Multi-Exchange Trading and Portfolio Management Platforms Ranking 2020
Trade on multiple exchanges from a single platform and avoid the hassle of multiple logins, different interfaces, constant tab changing and overall keeping track of balance holdings and trades.
https://preview.redd.it/ksar6fkxmfv51.jpg?width=1200&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=b8629b0f29aefd9546d816413cc82de9656ef7f9
With more than 300 cryptocurrency exchanges today, most traders have to manage multiple exchange accounts.
The need for more than one account usually rises because of the variety of offered crypto currency pairs, market liquidity, having to diversify the risk of being hacked, as well as the different trading tools and terms each exchange offers.
Trading and keeping track of your portfolios on multiple exchanges is time consuming, inefficient and frustrating. Having to log on different platforms, use different interfaces, keeping track of multiple portfolios and all trading related activities become increasingly difficult with each new account.
It would be simple and easy if you could connect all those exchange accounts into a single multi-exchange platform which combines all the data in real time and provides a single interface to control all remote exchange accounts.

Multi-exchange platforms

A multi-exchange platform allows the traders to connect all their exchange accounts into a single account through the user of API keys generated from the account of each exchange.
Once all accounts are connected into a single one, using the exchanges interfaces becomes obsolete. The unified account will now track and combine all portfolios and traders will be able to track prices, order statuses and other data across all exchange accounts from a single interface.
In addition, most multi-exchange platforms provide various information tools such as news aggregators, sentiment tools, arbitrage matrix and price alerts.
With regards to API keys security, these platforms do not require withdrawal or deposit permissions which limits the possibility of fraud and loss of funds.
Finally, multi-exchange platforms do not typically charge additional trading fees and do not require lengthy verification procedures.

The current top platforms

Currently there are a handful of multi-exchange platforms with a variety of services. They range from a simple crypto portfolio tracker to an advanced trading and portfolio management platform. A detailed list of all major multi-exchange platforms and their features can be found here: www.AltXpert.com
Here is an overview of the top 9 multi-exchange trading and portfolio management platforms:

1. CryptoView

https://preview.redd.it/1n7d13phnfv51.jpg?width=1899&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=8d377fa3bbe1d79abebc8c48d709ccc86486f3c8
CryptoView is a multi-exchange trading and portfolio management platform equipped with a handful of useful integrations such as various cryptocurrency trading tools, portfolio analytics, a multi-source news aggregator, crypto events calendar and an outstanding multi-charting interface allowing endless customizations. It is an all-in-one solution for traders, crypto enthusiasts and professional fund managers.
CryptoView is a fully functional trading platform allowing you to trade on all major cryptocurrency exchanges from a single secured interface.
https://preview.redd.it/bx3uo5sxnfv51.jpg?width=625&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=a6422960d15fe2ec8e2ec2c93eb7a148e34a8bb1

2. Bitsgap

https://preview.redd.it/lc7pyhornfv51.jpg?width=1622&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=4cc3bfac8c53352402e30fe97d0ae5eafc2b6a1c
Bitsgap is an аll-in-one crypto trading platform designed to cover cross platform API trading and portfolio management with connection with most popular crypto exchanges and wallets. This multi-exchange cryptocurrency platform offers in addition to the full specter of trading tools the opportunity to use arbitrage trading on main and altcoins.
Integrated charts are powered by TradingView with all the provided drawing tools and technical indicators. Through API connection users can track and manage their entire portfolio at once.
https://preview.redd.it/jtkwnos0ofv51.jpg?width=625&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=75947f76df659f2d928a6e893356251309086bea

3. Conigy

https://preview.redd.it/kol3xys6ofv51.jpg?width=1622&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=0f1dd0dfb96a1d47594218c5bd726111295c3d7f
Coinigy is a web based multi-exchange API trading platform combining full scope of trading features such as: advanced trade orders, price alerts, market data overview, crypto news and integrated charts from TradingView. The platform offers connection to more than 25 crypto exchanges and wallets covering most of the main and altcoins.
Single portfolio management is one of the main features of this multi-exchange cryptocurrency platform. Portfolio management across multiple exchanges and wallets can be performed from one unified account.
https://preview.redd.it/na5wvaq7ofv51.jpg?width=625&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=9a444ccbb4e3efc5664f58d80e189df34913cc57

4. Quadency

https://preview.redd.it/auhy53wbofv51.jpg?width=1622&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=bbd62b53a0cb5b3d80b61ac714f0f905f5f0f732
Quadency gives the opportunity to trade and manage an entire portfolio across multiple exchanges and trading platforms. By connecting API keys on existing accounts in exchanges and wallets, the users can execute advanced trading orders from one interface. All features combined in this solution makes it an all-in-one crypto trading platform for main and altcoins.
https://preview.redd.it/bhzwjh2dofv51.jpg?width=625&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=dc80bc047e3c34d3539087686543408406f475ed

5. Crypto Hopper

https://preview.redd.it/5vkkezzkofv51.jpg?width=1622&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=4f979328687374d0c1a6da9096868cdfb99982bd
Cryptohopperis a multi-exchange trading and automated trading bot platform for cryptocurrencies. It allows its users to automate trading strategies that will trade cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple and any other that supported exchanges offers.
Cryptohopperis designed to make traders more efficient by allowing them to copy other traders, automatically analyze the markets, manage all exchange accounts from one place and even use advanced tools like backtesting, market-making, and arbitrage.
https://preview.redd.it/jnwxcrcnofv51.jpg?width=625&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=db672f248d6367ffdebce1bbf8de0d87a9211e64

6. LCX Terminal

https://preview.redd.it/aq234m6sofv51.jpg?width=1622&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=53826a55cee5acadd9a0a40254b75a67546a41b8
LCX Terminal brings together real-time and full historical data of all major cryptocurrencies and trading pairs, smart automated and manual trading across all platforms, breaking news desk, social trading signals, powerful analytics and portfolio reporting — all combined in one platform. LCX Terminal cryptocurrency trading software is made for everyday traders as well as professional and institutional investors.
https://preview.redd.it/ffru2g1tofv51.jpg?width=625&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=77b821d77b017871ffff0dc8d62408aef7a0ca31

7. Hyperlinq

https://preview.redd.it/axmmul3yofv51.jpg?width=1622&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=a3c55f5c168d855c572dfdf6dcd01f74722ddfd3
HyperLinq™ brings institutional-grade software with superior technology for digital assets and cryptocurrencies traders. Allows the users to track crypto assets on any major exchange or wallet through API connection. A simplified portfolio manager for cryptocurrencies and digital assets.
https://preview.redd.it/m3rfcdsyofv51.jpg?width=625&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=d114c36c6d8798dfff836e8051d451f892e02936

8. Altrady

https://preview.redd.it/c7b0hn13pfv51.jpg?width=1622&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=0b1e80867b2d01215b6cb7470aa11f3400847056
Altrady is a comprehensive cryptocurrency trading platform. The platform provides full trading information such as price chart, order book, trade history, and depth chart.
It also offers immediate price alerts, portfolio manager, break-even calculator, and customizable trading pages by allowing traders to manipulate widgets to create preferred layout in order to trade comfortably, limit ladder order, gain quick access to market tabs, and integrated market scanners.
https://preview.redd.it/tgl99pu3pfv51.jpg?width=625&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=6ffb6436bedc39f118313988099991005ab964ae

9. Aurox

https://preview.redd.it/uy5khd87pfv51.jpg?width=1622&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=7db7651ce4879b50bc46c9fff05f0736e98dac0c
Auroxis a trading terminal that enables traders to supercharge their returns. With its multi-exchange integrated workspaces, Aurox provides a better platform for portfolio management, leads to faster trades and higher results for cryptocurrency investors.
https://preview.redd.it/cwfamzr7pfv51.jpg?width=625&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=5427f35780a45617bb3b2a9c2abc37492f68ec4c
submitted by altXpert to u/altXpert [link] [comments]

Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given public key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

DV/ABUSIVE COURT There's more to this Nightmare

their father worked for the local internet company decided to spy on me admitted it openly don't have perfect evidence of that at the moment either because I lost the online accounts it was saved on or impossible to connect to any printers. He later quit internet company and work for the electric company then Microsoft . Once he spied on me long enough he felt he had evidence and dirt on me enough to raise my child support to a very unreasonable amount when I already paid 100% for the children and paid a good amount of child support every month and had them 40% of the time . I could not afford to pay it he decided to kidnap my younger one during the times that I would have always have her. My children have been going through the domestic violence an abuse their entire life. the day of the trial hearing, I had denial of service attack. where I could not get Wi-Fi nor data on mobile. that I have always paid for. Which made it so my alarm did not go off and I was late for trail. yes the guardian of alliance said the children would be super with me if I was more stable. which was because online it says I have about 10 more addresses than I actually lived at. She said the kids were not safe with him and his wife. my son 17 yrs, went in courts filed for two restraining orders & provided proof of physical abuse and he was deneyed the judge did not seem to feel as if it was abuse . One day I received a call from my children's father. I was hoping you wanted to discuss the children but all I could hear on the other end Were sounds of computers, similar to a fax machine. Shortly after that I lost all my online accounts had a brute Force attack. My last pass and keeper did not help me either because I couldn't reach them or because they chose not to help. I noticed the last time I was able to access my passwords some of my accounts were changed to my social security number. Which I would never do. So my identity any form of privacy,all my work art an memories gone. my whole digital Life. My son who is in high school lost a lot of his hard work and the Mac, I recently purchased for. I could not access our router majority of the time. while my internet company where he used to work, lied to me and said there's no such thing as a network hack and we're not willing to help. I could not use our cellular data or Wi-Fi on my electronics but majority of the family still could use the internet on some of their mobile devices. I was panicking trying to reach my customers the company that I subcontracted for but unfortunately I was redirected to spammers. I ended up using all of our financial savings to pay rent and buy more mobile devices a new computer and any type of internet security I could possibly fine in a very small town. I could not buy anything else online I had too many online fraud charges that I was continuously fighting. I could not use the vpns I always would get a sever error and my antiviruses somehow were rerouted and I would continuously be locked out. Majority of the new electronics I bought would be compromised and controlled within minutes to a day or two, thanks to the Internet of things. My family can't even reach out for help with their hack devices services with the same local internet company. They are constantly being overcharged slow connection and additional charges like voice over IP . I've purchased at least 10 phones in the last year. My cell phone companies either have no clue or ignored me or treatme as If I was a terrorist, who was just begging to get help controling my data and my children's baby photos. I've gone through over a hundred emails since I kept losing access to them even though I had the password written down. I had DNS poisoning so majority of the websites. I still am I can't even get court forms sometimes server cant find Wacourt.gov & washingtonhelp.org I can't seem to talk to a lawyer that I've been approved for multiple times through the Northwest Justice project. for my mobile phone will consistently hang up. I can't call the non emergency 911. My emails don't go through or are blocked. Many websites I visit seem to be cloned in insecure. JavaScript would not give me access to majority of the security settings in all my browsers. There is always new extensions and apps and open source license for untrustworthy certificate and cant reach the same security settings in my browsers. I cannot turn on or off like family sharing when I don't even have a family connected to that mobile device. Can't turn off USB tethering and Google pay and apple wallets has multiple transactions not by me. cannot turn them off or use them. for they are lightened out or I don't have access. Sim card & ip always changed. 5000 $ in extra international charges hit my credit report along with new numbers emails and new addresses. Cant reach for help when device have so much static and lose connection. If I try to connect my email account to a computer. It will say I need a physical key to access it. as if I set it up myself. when every computer I own now Is broke or has locked me out. I gave up but was sad for I could not keep tabs or communicate with my children. unless I borrowed a phone. They mapped out my family and contacts so if I were to borrow a phone and try to reach out for help I usually reached spam or foreign hotline or got disconnected. Then the locals were acting strange. Like sitting outside our house taking photos of us &things were stolen of property. When we were out of town. then the landlord had strange men over pretending to fix things that didn't need to be fixed installing pipes underground , laying down new soil& having some Wi-Fi farming company working in our yard 5:00 a.m. I also notice a few times the electric companies employees were messing with our power boxes, in the middle of the night . Then My photos came out extremely bright. the family videos look like we lived in a microwave oven. I know it's very strange! I do have evidence. If I would get a new router my children's father would come over take the children and their phones from them and install something on their device saying that he had to change the password on their Netflix account, so he needed to use their phone. When I would purposely break the router the electric company would show up before the internet cable company and be across the street fixing power lines. bought the children new phones and then he puts another restraining order on me and the children saying that I stole my daughters phone and won't allow her to use it. when she didn't want to use it for some reason she has on 5 gb and ends up with no data within a couple days and has to use Wi-Fi all the time. Apple finally told me they couldn't help me with iphone for it was a government issue. I thought that was hilarious for I didn't do anything wrong unless the person who was using my accounts did. I figured it would pass I mean if you're under an investigation. it would only be for a few months right ? Not two years ! well nothing happened I mean there was no reason for anything to happen. I did notice that police were driving by the house a lot. Then I thought maybe it must have been my roommate they might be after. Then why am I the one who lost everything and dealing with network abuse. My roommate was in a bad guy he did have a bit of a criminal history but nothing considered to be violent maybe just a couple drunken stupid events. Then during the process of moving my children and roommates out of the house.while drivin my car mysteriously blew up because of some electrical issue. Luckily the children were not in the car. There were no warnings & no issues with car. It took the fire department about two minutes find me but it was totaled. I could not afford to fix it or have a mechanic look at that time . Then somebody I did not no had it towed and I lost it. I was in the router that I can't get into majority of the time and saw a port forwarding to a local Bitcoin mining pool. Then it I received another server error . He continues to harass me and threaten me or he knows everything we do in our own privacy our own bedrooms where we're going who we're going with how much money says he's recording everything it seems to know everything before I can even share it with a girlfriend. He's throwing everything against me in The family Court and continues to commit perjury while I have proved him wrong multiple times but still aren't getting the protection and respect in this local small town courtroom I have currently moved to Spokane Washington to get away from it I do the traveling for the judge is now took my daughter from coming to Spokane Washington and requiring me to stay with my children at my parents home. When they are almost fully grown she is going to be 15 soon she should have a choice to bpick who she feel safe enough to live with. without him constantly tracking and destroying every electronic I have after calling my daughter then receive Non-Stop spam and scripts over SMS and once I go to my parents more and more viruses are downloaded. I've been told multiple times by a few computer companies and files that I have some sort of invisible beacon. How ? Seattle times has reported that the local electric company and crypto miners are being questioned for unauthorized usage of other families in the small town electricity for maximum power leaving us in a unsafe situation to build more cryptocurrency . Please I appreciate Any help and advice!
submitted by u-turnshe to FamilyLaw [link] [comments]

Zano Newcomers Introduction/FAQ - please read!

Welcome to the Zano Sticky Introduction/FAQ!

https://preview.redd.it/al1gy9t9v9q51.png?width=424&format=png&auto=webp&s=b29a60402d30576a4fd95f592b392fae202026ca
Hopefully any questions you have will be answered by the resources below, but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments. If you're quite technically-minded, the Zano whitepaper gives a thorough overview of Zano's design and its main features.
So, what is Zano? In brief, Zano is a project started by the original developers of CryptoNote. Coins with market caps totalling well over a billion dollars (Monero, Haven, Loki and countless others) run upon the codebase they created. Zano is a continuation of their efforts to create the "perfect money", and brings a wealth of enhancements to their original CryptoNote code.
Development happens at a lightning pace, as the Github activity shows, but Zano is still very much a work-in-progress. Let's cut right to it:
Here's why you should pay attention to Zano over the next 12-18 months. Quoting from a recent update:
Anton Sokolov has recently joined the Zano team. ... For the last months Anton has been working on theoretical work dedicated to log-size ring signatures. These signatures theoretically allows for a logarithmic relationship between the number of decoys and the size/performance of transactions. This means that we can set mixins at a level from up to 1000, keeping the reasonable size and processing speed of transactions. This will take Zano’s privacy to a whole new level, and we believe this technology will turn out to be groundbreaking!
If successful, this scheme will make Zano the most private, powerful and performant CryptoNote implementation on the planet. Bar none. A quantum leap in privacy with a minimal increase in resource usage. And if there's one team capable of pulling it off, it's this one.

What else makes Zano special?

You mean aside from having "the Godfather of CryptoNote" as the project lead? ;) Actually, the calibre of the developers/researchers at Zano probably is the project's single greatest strength. Drawing on years of experience, they've made careful design choices, optimizing performance with an asynchronous core architecture, and flexibility and extensibility with a modular code structure. This means that the developers are able to build and iterate fast, refining features and adding new ones at a rate that makes bigger and better-funded teams look sluggish at best.
Zano also has some unique features that set it apart from similar projects:
Privacy Firstly, if you're familiar with CryptoNote you won't be surprised that Zano transactions are private. The perfect money is fungible, and therefore must be untraceable. Bitcoin, for the most part, does little to hide your transaction data from unscrupulous observers. With Zano, privacy is the default.
The untraceability and unlinkability of Zano transactions come from its use of ring signatures and stealth addresses. What this means is that no outside observer is able to tell if two transactions were sent to the same address, and for each transaction there is a set of possible senders that make it impossible to determine who the real sender is.
Hybrid PoW-PoS consensus mechanism Zano achieves an optimal level of security by utilizing both Proof of Work and Proof of Stake for consensus. By combining the two systems, it mitigates their individual vulnerabilities (see 51% attack and "nothing at stake" problem). For an attack on Zano to have even a remote chance of success the attacker would have to obtain not only a majority of hashing power, but also a majority of the coins involved in staking. The system and its design considerations are discussed at length in the whitepaper.
Aliases Here's a stealth address: ZxDdULdxC7NRFYhCGdxkcTZoEGQoqvbZqcDHj5a7Gad8Y8wZKAGZZmVCUf9AvSPNMK68L8r8JfAfxP4z1GcFQVCS2Jb9wVzoe. I have a hard enough time remembering my phone number. Fortunately, Zano has an alias system that lets you register an address to a human-readable name. (@orsonj if you want to anonymously buy me a coffee)
Multisig
Multisignature (multisig) refers to requiring multiple keys to authorize a Zano transaction. It has a number of applications, such as dividing up responsibility for a single Zano wallet among multiple parties, or creating backups where loss of a single seed doesn't lead to loss of the wallet.
Multisig and escrow are key components of the planned Decentralized Marketplace (see below), so consideration was given to each of them from the design stages. Thus Zano's multisig, rather than being tagged on at the wallet-level as an afterthought, is part of its its core architecture being incorporated at the protocol level. This base-layer integration means months won't be spent in the future on complicated refactoring efforts in order to integrate multisig into a codebase that wasn't designed for it. Plus, it makes it far easier for third-party developers to include multisig (implemented correctly) in any Zano wallets and applications they create in the future.
(Double Deposit MAD) Escrow
With Zano's escrow service you can create fully customizable p2p contracts that are designed to, once signed by participants, enforce adherence to their conditions in such a way that no trusted third-party escrow agent is required.
https://preview.redd.it/jp4oghyhv9q51.png?width=1762&format=png&auto=webp&s=12a1e76f76f902ed328886283050e416db3838a5
The Particl project, aside from a couple of minor differences, uses an escrow scheme that works the same way, so I've borrowed the term they coined ("Double Deposit MAD Escrow") as I think it describes the scheme perfectly. The system requires participants to make additional deposits, which they will forfeit if there is any attempt to act in a way that breaches the terms of the contract. Full details can be found in the Escrow section of the whitepaper.
The usefulness of multisig and the escrow system may not seem obvious at first, but as mentioned before they'll form the backbone of Zano's Decentralized Marketplace service (described in the next section).

What does the future hold for Zano?

The planned upgrade to Zano's privacy, mentioned at the start, is obviously one of the most exciting things the team is working on, but it's not the only thing.
Zano Roadmap
Decentralized Marketplace
From the beginning, the Zano team's goal has been to create the perfect money. And money can't just be some vehicle for speculative investment, money must be used. To that end, the team have created a set of tools to make it as simple as possible for Zano to be integrated into eCommerce platforms. Zano's API’s and plugins are easy to use, allowing even those with very little coding experience to use them in their E-commerce-related ventures. The culmination of this effort will be a full Decentralized Anonymous Marketplace built on top of the Zano blockchain. Rather than being accessed via the wallet, it will act more as a service - Marketplace as a Service (MAAS) - for anyone who wishes to use it. The inclusion of a simple "snippet" of code into a website is all that's needed to become part a global decentralized, trustless and private E-commerce network.
Atomic Swaps
Just as Zano's marketplace will allow you to transact without needing to trust your counterparty, atomic swaps will let you to easily convert between Zano and other cyryptocurrencies without having to trust a third-party service such as a centralized exchange. On top of that, it will also lead to the way to Zano's inclusion in the many decentralized exchange (DEX) services that have emerged in recent years.

Where can I buy Zano?

Zano's currently listed on the following exchanges:
https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/zano/markets/
It goes without saying, neither I nor the Zano team work for any of the exchanges or can vouch for their reliability. Use at your own risk and never leave coins on a centralized exchange for longer than necessary. Your keys, your coins!
If you have any old graphics cards lying around(both AMD & NVIDIA), then Zano is also mineable through its unique ProgPowZ algorithm. Here's a guide on how to get started.
Once you have some Zano, you can safely store it in one of the desktop or mobile wallets (available for all major platforms).

How can I support Zano?

Zano has no marketing department, which is why this post has been written by some guy and not the "Chief Growth Engineer @ Zano Enterprises". The hard part is already done: there's a team of world class developers and researchers gathered here. But, at least at the current prices, the team's funds are enough to cover the cost of development and little more. So the job of publicizing the project falls to the community. If you have any experience in community building/growth hacking at another cryptocurrency or open source project, or if you're a Zano holder who would like to ensure the project's long-term success by helping to spread the word, then send me a pm. We need to get organized.
Researchers and developers are also very welcome. Working at the cutting edge of mathematics and cryptography means Zano provides challenging and rewarding work for anyone in those fields. Please contact the project's Community Manager u/Jed_T if you're interested in joining the team.
Social Links:
Twitter
Discord Server
Telegram Group
Medium blog
I'll do my best to keep this post accurate and up to date. Message me please with any suggested improvements and leave any questions you have below.
Welcome to the Zano community and the new decentralized private economy!
submitted by OrsonJ to Zano [link] [comments]

How to purchase and exchange your litecoin! (longer read)

This post will show you the best ways to buy litecoins using many different payment methods and exchanges for each method.
Before you start, make sure you have a good litecoin wallet to store your LTC. NEVER store your litecoins on a crypto exchange.

Popular Exchanges

eToro
Coinbase
Coinmama

Buy Litecoin with Credit Card or Debit Card

Let’s dive into some of the exchanges supporting Litecoin credit card purchases.
These exchanges are our favorite ways to buy.

Coinbase

Coinbase is the easiest way to buy litecoins with a credit card.
Coinbase is available in the United States, Canada, Europe, UK, Singapore, and Australia.
The fees will come out to 3.99% per purchase.
Here is a good video that can help walk you through the process of buying on Coinbase, although it’s fairly easy.

Coinmama

Coinmama recently added the ability to buy litecoin directly on the platform. Users from nearly any country in the world can use Coinmama to buy litecoins.
Coinmama has some of the highest limits among credit card exchanges.

BitPanda

BitPanda is based in Austria and is a crypto brokerage service. You can buy using a credit card from most European countries.

CEX.io

CEX.io is based in the UK and is one of the oldest crypto exchanges online.
CEX.io supports litecoin and its users from nearly anywhere in the world can buy litecoin with credit card on the platform.

Buy Litecoin with Bank Account or Bank Transfer

Coinbase

Coinbase is the easiest way to buy litecoins with a bank account or transfer.
Coinbase, like is is for credit cards, is available in the United States, Canada, Europe, UK, Singapore, and Australia.
Coinbase is one of primary exchanges used to buy Litecoins.
Americans can use ACH transfer (5–7 days wait), and Europeans can use SEPA transfer (1–3 days wait).
The fees will come out to 1.49% per purchase.

BitPanda

BitPanda is based in Austria and is a crypto brokerage service. You can buy using SEPA transfer from most European countries. You can also use SOFORT, NETELLER, or GiroPay.

CEX.io

CEX.io also supports litecoin buys via bank account. This is via wire transfer for US citizens, SEPA for Europe, and SWIFT for the rest of the globe.

Binance

Binance is now one of the largest if not the largest cryptocurrency exchange in the world. It supports bank and card purchases of Litecoin as well as Litecoin trading pairs with Bitcoin and Etehreum.

Get a Litecoin Wallet

Before we move onto other options:
Never store your litecoins on an exchange!
Always withdrawal your litecoin to an offline cryptocurrency wallet like the Ledger Nano S or any other wallet that you control.
The Ledger Nano S and TREZOR are the best options for secure storage.

Other Methods to Buy Litecoin

If you don’t have a card or want to avoid the high fees, you can use the following methods to buy Litecoin as well.
Find out which one works best for you.

Buy Litecoin with PayPal

Unfortunately, there is no easy way to buy Litecoin with PayPal. Other sites will tell you that cex allows for this, but that is no longer the case.
You can, however, now use eToro to buy Litecoin, unless you live in the United States.
If you live in the US, the only way to buy Litecoin with Paypal is to buy Bitcoin using paypal, and then use the Bitcoins to buy Litecoin. You can easily buy Bitcoin using Paypal on Local Bitcoins. Once you have Bitcoin, you can use an exchange like Coinbase Pro to swap the Bitcoin for Litecoin.

Buy Litecoin with Cash

There is no good way to buy litecoins with cash. LocalBitcoins is the most popular way to buy bitcoins with cash, and it does not have Litecoin support. Other popular cash to Bitcoin exchanges like BitQuick and Wall of Coins also do not support LTC. So you will have to first buy bitcoins with cash then exchange them for LTC using the method described below.
The same goes for Bitcoin ATMs. Most do not support Litecoin. So if you want to buy litecoins at a Bitcoin ATM you first have to buy bitcoins and then trade the BTC for litecoins.

Buy Litecoin with Bitcoin

If you already have Bitcoins then it is VERY simple to convert some of your BTC to litecoins.
You just need to find an exchange with the LTC/BTC pair, which is most exchanges since LTC/BTC is a very popular pair to trade.

Buy Litecoin with Skrill

BitPanda, mentioned above, also accepts Skrill payments for LTC. The fees will vary and are simply included in your buy price.

Cryptmixer

Cryptmixer is probably the fastest way to convert BTC to Litecoin. You just enter the amount of LTC you want to buy, and give them a LTC address. Then they will tell you how much BTC to send to their address. Once your BTC is sent, you will have LTC delivered to your wallet very shortly after.

Buy Litecoin with Ethereum

Ethereum has experienced a massive price rise. Nearly a year ago it was $10, and now at over $500, many want to move some of their ETH gains into other coins like Litecoin.
Litecoin has very good liquidity, and is very popular among traders especially in China.
So this guide is going to show you how to buy litecoins with Ethereum. We will show some of the best exchanges you can use, and the pros and cons of using different types of exchanges over the other.

Cryptmixer

Cryptmixer is one of the most unique exchanges, and also one of the fastest ways to convert your ETH to LTC.
With Cryptmixer you do not even need to store your money with the exchange, meaning you are at very little risk of getting your funds stolen.
With Cryptmixer you simply specify the amount of LTC you want to buy, and specific the address to where your litecoins should be sent and within 30 minutes you will have LTC delivered to your wallet.

Poloniex

Poloniex is the world’s largest altcoin exchange. However, there is a huge downside to using Poloniex to convert your ETH to LTC:
Poloniex does not have a LTC/ETH market, meaning you have to first trade your ETH to BTC, and then trade your BTC for LTC.
While this method works, you will have to make multiple trades and also pay fees twice.

ShapeShift

Shapeshift is basically the same as Cryptmixer, and was actually the first company to come up with the concept of an exchange that does not hold your own funds.

Frequently Asked Questions About Buying Litecoin

Many of you may still have lots of questions about how to buy Litecoin.
Odds are we have answered almost any question you could think of below.
We will aim to answer many of the most common questions relating to buying Litecoin.

Why are there limited options to buying Litecoin using other altcoins?

The issue in all crypto markets is liquidity. As the space gets bigger, the liquidity also gets better. But as of now, the only VERY liquid cryptocurrency is Bitcoin. So exchanging two altcoins between each other is often harder than if BTC was involved on one side of the trade.

How much is a Litecoin worth?

Like all currencies, the value of Litecoin changes every second. The value of Litecoin also depends on the country you are in and the exchange you are trading on. You can find the most up to date price on Coinbase.

How do I buy Ripple (XRP) with Litecoin?

The best way to buy Ripple using Litecoin is to either use a non KYC exchange like Cryptmixer or start an account on Binance or Coinbase Pro and sell your Litecoin for Ripple. Look for LTC/XRP trading pairs, and make your trade.

How long does Litecoin take to confirm?

Litecoin blocks are added ever 2 and a half minutes. That means you should get one confirmation every two and a half minutes. This can vary if it takes miners longer to discover a block, but the difficulty of the finding a block should change proportionate to the hashing power on the network so that a block gets added approximately every 2.5 minutes.
If you are trying to send money to a merchant, they may require more than one confirmation before they send you products. If you are depositing on an exchange, they may also require three or more confirmations before they credit your account.

How many Litoshis make one Litecoin?

one hundred million (100,000,000) Litoshis make one (1) Litecoin.

Where do I store Litecoin?

The best place to store litecoin is on a hardware wallet. You can find the best one for you on our page dedicated to hardware wallets.

When is the Litecoin halving?

The expected date of the next Litecoin block reward halving is August 7th, 2023.

Why can litecoin take so long to buy?

Litecoin can take long to buy because the legacy banking system is very slow. If you are buying with another cryptocurrency, you will see how fast it is to buy!
Bank transfer in the USA, for example, take about 5 days to complete. So any purchase of Litecoin made with a US bank transfer will take a minimum of 5 days.

How do I buy Litecoin with Paypal?

Unfortunately, there is no easy way to buy Litcoin with PayPal. Other sites will tell you that cex allows for this, but that is no longer the case.
You can, however, now use eToro to buy Litcoineum, unless you live in the United States.
If you live in the US, the only way to buy Litcoin with Paypal is to buy Bitcoin using paypal, and then use the Bitcoins to buy Litcoin. You can easily buy Bitcoin using Paypal on Local Bitcoins. Once you have Bitcoin, you can use an exchange like Cryptmixer to swap the Bitcoin for Litcoin.

Can you buy partial litecoins?

Yes, litecoin, like Bitcoin, is divisible to many decimal places so you can buy 0.1 LTC, 0.001 LTC, etc.

Can you sell litecoin?

Yes, you can sell LTC on most of the exchanges mentioned above. The fees, speed, and privacy is the same in most cases.

Can anyone buy litecoins?

Anyone is free to buy litecoins, as long as you find an exchange that supports your country. Most cryptocurrency wallets do not require ID to sign up so you can always make a wallet and get paid in litecoin, too.

Which payment method is best to use?

For speed, credit card will likely be fastest. For larger amounts, bank transfer is best. For privacy, it’s best to buy bitcoins with cash and then trade for litecoins using Cryptmixer or Shapeshift.

Is it better to mine or buy litecoins?

If you have cheap electricity, it might be worth it to mine litecoins. If you have solar power or just want to mine for fun then it could be worth it. Otherwise, it’s probably better just to buy.
Mining is constantly changing and small changes in Litecoin price or electricity can greatly affect your profitability.

What should I do with my litecoins once I buy?

You should immediately move your litecoins into a secure wallet. You should never leave your litecoins on an exchange. There have been countless hacks in cryptocurrency since Bitcoin was created in 2009. Hundreds of thousands of people have lost money. So buy your litecoins, and then instantly send them into a wallet you control so you are not at risk of losing money to a hack or scam.
submitted by MonishaNuij to MonMonCrypto [link] [comments]

100 Days later. From noob to moons. I wrote this “guide” based on my journey into crypto.

It’s already been 100 days. What a ride it’s been. I created this account and joined this sub not long after I bought my very first ETH. That’s right, I skipped Bitcoin and my first foray into crypto was Ethereum. I was never sold on BTC and even when it was booming back in the day I didn’t feel like I missed out on anything. I just don’t believe in it if I’m being honest. I respect everything about Bitcoin and Satoshi (whoever you are) sounds like a genius and a revolutionary but I don’t see the use case potential with it. I consider Bitcoin like the Metallica of crypto, a little analogy for myself. I’m a big fan of bands like Tool and The Deftones and I give credit where it’s due to Metallica for paving the way for them to be able to make new music. Bitcoin started the movement but I was sold on the progressive thinkers that followed it. Ethereum is my main commitment and always will be. Vitalik is a very weird person and that is what drew me to it initially. I saw a Vice documentary when I was first looking into crypto to understand and they also included a bonus bit with him. Those were enough to spark my interest and it sort of sent me into a wormhole of research. That was back in March.
I like to think I’ve come a long way. Since I was unemployed I decided to spend my spare time studying crypto. I started with exchanges. Being from Canada my options definitely seemed limited, as a noob at least. Google helped most of the way by putting in things like “Ethereum explained” and “How to store crypto” which brought up a lot of useful information. Overwhelming to say the least. But I didn’t stop at the basics. No, no, no. It made me fascinated with blockchain as a technology beyond cryptocurrency. I read the Ethereum Whitepaper after the Bitcoin whitepaper because everyone should read that one. Satoshi started this, if you don’t understand why he(or she or however they identify) created Bitcoin then you will never understand cryptocurrency fully. Then it came time to buy some.
I initially tried eToro and was immediately hit with the “service not available in Canada” issue. So I searched exchanges in Canada and found Coinberry, Shakepay and the already defunct Quadriga. Thankfully the quadriga news was easy to search so it didn’t take long for me to become paranoid about my investments. Coinsquare was also an option that turned out to also be a scam. After eToro I tried Coinberry and I submitted my KYC info and all then crickets they ghosted me. I’d been in contact with customer service prior to submitting and they seemed fine until then. I persevered. Shakepay was next. Fingers were crossed going into this one. I chatted with Shakepay customer service for the better part of an hour on my first day. I asked all of the technical questions and also the stupid ones. I wanted transparency and got it from them. So I bought 1 whole ETH. Next I had to figure out a wallet.
This was difficult. I didn’t need a hardware wallet for 1 ETH, that was overkill. I learned early that the exchange isn’t safe “not your keys not your coins” is a common expression. So I found that middle ground in Atomic Wallet. I did a lot of searching before settling on them. Metamask was the other thought but when I had taken a solidity crash course I struggled with it and didn’t try again. The other wallet options I considered were Exodus Wallet and Guarda. I don’t want to break this down to a full wallet review but I will say that I use both Atomic and Exodus and they are great. I’ve never had an issue and the customer service communication has always been great. They’re transparent and helpful as long as you don’t try to attack them and blame them when you have issues.
What I liked about Atomic when I first looked into it was the very helpful knowledge base they’ve created. The embedded links are to the wallets respective educational resources. If you asked me I’d say people don’t spend enough time reading at least the FAQ of a wallet, exchange or app that they use. Personally, I have read just about every article on both Exodus and Atomic (aside from the ones that repeat the same thing) so that I don’t have to ask everything. If you do take some time, and not that much, you will see they state “We will never ask you to enter your seed for any reason” and that would prevent so many phishing scams, which is what happens when people think they’re hacked. I think it’s important that everyone takes a moment to read about how to avoid being phished. Also check this one about things like pump and dumps and ICO scams.
Now about the community. This place is awesome and I’m glad that I found this sub. It is certainly one of the best subs I’ve joined. I’m also subscribed to just about every single other crypto sub you can find, I like to know what’s going on in every project. I have my favourites and there are a few I’m certainly opposed to but I try to remain as unbiased as possible. I don’t let my investments influence my arguments because that makes it too emotionally driven. I argue with what I’ve read and learned about and am always willing to be told I’m wrong. The moons were such an important factor to that. When I first started into crypto I thought that moons would impact ETH price because I though “reddit is huge, everyone will want ETH after” but I was stupidly wrong. I would never think that again but I wanted to admit so everyone knows that we all start without basic knowledge in this. I wanted moons but my new account wasn’t allowed to post. I had to wait 50 days. What did I do? Engaged in other communities. I learned from other projects. Knowledge is power and it’s by learning and by gaining that knowledge before I could post it only took me 4 weeks to earn 35,000(nearest makes no difference) moons.
During my pre-posting time I read multiple whitepapers for projects like NEO, Ripple(to which I am known to be opposed to but bias aside I’ve listed), Stellar, Komodo, Vechain, [Cardano(not really a whitepaper more of a “why” paper)](https://[cardano.org/why/) and so many more.
I just wanted to link some so that people can read some varying whitepaper to get the differences in ideas. It’s tedious but these are the best ways to understand what’s going on and what the potential of blockchain is. I also got comfortable with reading charts because it’s important for learning trends. I don’t know all the technical terms and buzzwords for patterns but I recognize rhythm and patterns in things and combine that with my own best guess to figure out what to move for. I like statistics so it isn’t boring to me to read them. I mostly use Coingecko for tracking coins and the news section is great. I have made a list of favourites(my own top 40) and I check them daily. Multiple times daily to be honest. I also use Cointelegraph for news, I like their artwork. I also use decrypt because they tend to have more Ethereum and Altcoin news.
Anyway, this has gotten beyond long enough. I hope it is helpful to some. I kind of wish I had found a resource with everything I needed to know to get started in one easy place. There isn’t. But this is a good way to get started.
Thank you for reading. Everything I say is open to constructive criticism but let’s keep it sensible and respectful.
submitted by ethereumflow to u/ethereumflow [link] [comments]

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